Have you completed your 2018 your continuing education yet? You are running out of time.

We recommend Jim Montrym and Andrea Worthington of the Mortgage Broker School.

You can reach them at (800) 735-8565, or use their web site which is :

http://www.brokerschool.com/ :category/industry-partners-processing-compliance/ 

I have used their services personally for the last 15 years. Always good, never bad. Don’t wait until the last minute, space is limited. thw8s1030z

If you use them for your CE please tell us because it could be a helpful bit of information in the event you are audited.

Nelson A. Locke, Esq.

Compliance Services USA

(800) 656-4584

States where current Audit Activity is high.

 

Hello folks, here comes December!

Is your required annual training for AML and GLB done and certified? If not, give us a call.

In the past six weeks we have assisted in responding to at least 15 state or CFPB Audits.

We have successfully negotiated the lifting of three suspensions and successfully negotiated reduced fines for violations an average of 50%.

 

Audit satsifactoryIf you need that kind of Compliance Expertise in your corner,

email us at nl@lockelaw.us

Current Active Audit States

  • Florida

  • Texas

  • Washington

  • Oregon

  • North Carolina

  • Michigan

  • Virginia

  • New York

For more information, contact us at (800) 656-4584.

Nelson A. Locke, Esq

Compliance Services, USA

 

Florida OFR Audit Alert

August 12th, 2018

This is a special alert for my clients.

In the last ten days five clients have received audit letters from the OFR. All five clients had NOT been audited in 8 to 10 years. One had not been audited in 20 years.

It appears to me as if the OFR is on a “catch up” campaign. This means we know of three confirmed danger areas for an OFR audit.

  1. If you are a new company with a new NMLS number, you will be audited in the first 18-24 months. Perhaps, sooner. 

  2. If it has been at least 7 years since your last audit, get ready. Use the checklist in Compliance Book Three to see how prepared you feel. Then let me know.

  3. If you have had a consumer complaint that you failed to respond to, you can expect a visit. 

But the big shocker is you old timers. Many of you may have been feeling complacent. That is not good.

Let’s pull out the checklist and be sure you feel aware and prepared. 

We are now offering a two session “MOCK AUDIT” for companies who want to go the extra mile to be sure they are prepared. If you have interest, email me and let me know so we can get you scheduled.

There is a cost of $1,000 for this service. It will save you many times that much in potential fines. We have proof. 

That’s it for now.

Nelson A. Locke, Esq

Compliance Services USA

(800) 656-4584

DODD FRANK REFORM BILL WEBINAR

Hi there.

The title says it all.

I will review the Dodd Frank Reform Bill as it affects Mortgage Brokers and Correspondent Lenders.

The webinar is free to subscribers, and will start promptly at 3:30 eastern time on Tuesday, June 26th.

To attend, go to https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/223553717

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (646) 749-3122
Access Code: 223-553-717

I might have some attachments for you if time allows, but in any case we can have a good discussion about how the DF Reforms might (or might not) affect you and your business.

See you there.

 

Nelson A. Locke, Esq

Compliance Services USA

(800) 656-4584

http://www.expertlenderservices.com

 

 

 

DODD FRANK REFORM BILL WEBINAR

Hi there.

The title says it all.

I will review the Dodd Frank Reform Bill as it affects Mortgage Brokers and Correspondent Lenders.

The webinar is free to subscribers, and will start promptly at 3:30 eastern time on Tuesday, June 26th.

To attend, go to https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/223553717

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (646) 749-3122
Access Code: 223-553-717

I might have some attachments for you if time allows, but in any case we can have a good discussion about how the DF Reforms might (or might not) affect you and your business.

See you there.

 

Nelson A. Locke, Esq

Compliance Services USA

(800) 656-4584

http://www.expertlenderservices.com

 

 

 

Rule Change regarding use of a CD to reset tolerances.

Under the TRID rule, a Loan Estimate is the disclosure primarily used to reset tolerances. Because the final revised Loan Estimate must be received by the consumer no later than four business days before consummation, the Commentary to the TRID rule includes a provision under which a creditor may use a Closing Disclosure to reset tolerances if “there are less than four business days between the time” a revised Loan Estimate would need to be provided and consummation. Because of the four-business-day timing element, in various cases when a creditor learns of a change, the creditor is not able to use a Closing Disclosure to reset tolerances. This situation is what the industry termed the “black hole.” The industry repeatedly asked the CFPB to address the black hole issue.

In the final rule the CFPB removes the four business day timing element, and makes clear that either an initial or a revised Closing Disclosure can be used to reset tolerances.

Consistent with the requirements for the Loan Estimate, when the TRID rule permits a creditor to use a Closing Disclosure to revise expenses, the creditor must provide the Closing Disclosure within three business days of receiving information sufficient to establish that a changed circumstance or other event triggering a change has occurred.

We are happy to answer any questions, just email us at nl@lockelaw.us

Nelson A. Locke, Esq.

Compliance Services USA 

(800) 656-4584

 

Template for Occupancy Fraud Affidavit

Recently I have encountered several situations where borrowers just flat out lied about their intent to occupy the subject property as their principal residence. The brokers were caught without sufficient evidence in their files that they properly verified the intent to the best of their ability. Thus, this affidavit was born. It covers both those who state their intention as owner occupied, and those who state their intention as non-owner occupied. If you put this on your letterhead and have it executed at closing it would be hard for a fraudulent minded borrower to point the finger back at you.

If this has happened to you and you need my help, contact me at nl@lockelaw.us

That’s it for now.

Here is the form. It is designed as a crystal clear WARNING.

“Do you intend to occupy this property as your principal residence?” or “Do you intend for this property to be non-owner occupied?”

These questions, indicated by check boxes on most mortgage loan applications, might seem straightforward. But if you misrepresent your intention, it is a crime known in real estate lingo as “occupancy fraud.”

Occupancy fraud occurs when a borrower says he or she plans to live in a home, all the while knowing the property will be rented out.  The key here is to note “all the while”. People can change their minds, but they will need to show compelling evidence that at the time they applied, closed, and funded the deal they absolutely intended for the property to be either their residence or a non-owner occupied investment property. 

Sometimes people change their mind after the fact.  That’s less serious than someone intentionally deceiving the lender by providing information indicating they are either going to occupy or not when they truly have the opposite  intention.

But it still maybe seen as an unintentional misrepresentation and give rise to a claim for damages by the lender that relied on the borrower’s statement about occupancy or investment use.

Most lenders’ loan documents define owner occupancy as a period of at least one year, but mortgage lenders have flexibility in their guidelines. If you intend to occupy a home, but move out within less than 12 months, you should notify the lender in writing and keep a copy of your letter.

Lenders perceive an owner-occupied transaction to be a safer credit risk than non owner occupied.

ONE LIE on a loan application may trigger a full-blown fraud investigation, and  you’ll be facing HUGE negative consequences if you get caught. IT IS A FELONY. But it gets worse. Lying on a mortgage loan application is so serious it can also be considered Money Laundering. ANOTHER FELONY. And then, there is the usual conspiracy charge. THREE FELONIES.

Technically, the mortgage lender could call your loan due and payable, raise your interest rate and payment, or foreclose on your loan.  Whatever does or doesn’t happen will be solely at the lender’s discretion.

The lender could file a Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) into the federal government’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), a centralized database that financial institutions use to report possible instances of fraud to law enforcement authorities. SARs could become a problem if you make a misrepresentation or outright false statement on a loan application and later want to move to another home or refinance your mortgage.

Understood, this _________ day of ________, 2018;

 

____________________________________            ___________________________________

Borrower                                                         Co-Borrower

 

___________________________________

Witness

 

Nelson A. Locke, Esq.

Compliance Services USA

(800) 656-4584